Oct 072008
 

Cyberport was intended to be the Sicilon Valley in Hong Kong, or a new IT international centre. What has it become today? Just a luxury residential project commanding ocean view, four office blocks, a five star hotel Le Meridien and a retail and entertaiment complex hardly visited by the locals. Over the years since the launch of its first and second phrase development in 2003, few IT companies have moved in. To fill up the office space, non IT or creative industry related businesses are now allowed to move in.

When I was there two weeks ago, I noticed that Hong Kong Univeristy’s continued education school SPACE has rented space in Cyberport as its classrooms.

On the other hand, flats in the luxury residential project Residence Bel-Air have been quickly snapped up. No wonder Cyberport project was criticized as more of a real estate project rather than what is intended for, granted by the Hong Kong government to the second son of Hong Kong’s richest man Li Ka Shing, Richard Li, without an open bid – a typical example of government-business collusion.

The above introduction is meant to say that Cyberport, with its failing mission, and open space largely empty, is good for the visit of tourists looking for a calm place in Hong Kong to chill out.

Cyberport is incoveniently located at the Southern part of Hong Kong island, on a 24-hectare site at the Telegraph Bay. Locals rarely go there because of lack of MTR train connection. The place only becomes a bit alive on weekends. This is probably the best time of the week to come to Cyberport.

The place has extensive green space with a campus atmosphere. You can find Starbucks Coffe shop and another coffee shop here, as well as some high-end restaurants which serve the weathly tenents in the Residence Bel-Air.  It also has a food court and a supermarket. So if you look for food choice other than those expensive restaurants, it won’t be a problem.

There is a cinema in the retail and recreation complex, if you look for some entertainment.

To energize the place, the management company organizes outdoor events on Sundays – not every Sunday though. In summer, bands are invited to play in the open space.

you see, not many people there for the band performance

These days (from September 21, 2008) there is a Sunday Market, where some exotic stuff are sold, from organic produce, arts and crafts, clothing to exotic plants and flowers, collectables, and handmade jewelry. Entry fee for adults is HK$20.

Check out here for how to go to Cyberport.

 Posted by at 7:34 am

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